Learn Your Special Education Laws, Special Education Rights, and Share IEP Goal Ideas

You are browsing the archive for Sign Language.

Are Least Restrictive Environments Actually Most Restrictive Environment In Disguise for Deaf Students?

May 10, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Doug Goldberg

As of 2004, the definition of ‘least restrictive environment’ as written in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA): “To the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including children in public or private institutions or other care facilities, are educated with children who are not disabled, and special classes, separate schooling, or other removal of children with disabilities from the regular educational environment occurs only when the nature or severity of the disability of a child is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily.

Essentially what that means is that the law views public schools as the “least restrictive environment.” But we have to remember the majority of laws that were passed have been written by hearing people, with little or no input from Deaf people. To hearing people, public schools are least restrictive in the sense that hearing people do not need to worry about accessibility issues or accommodations. Can we say the same about Deaf students? Are public schools truly “least restrictive environment” for Deaf students? Many hearing legislators, hearing administrators, and the hearing society want to believe that Deaf students can attend a public school and do just fine, as long as the Deaf student has cochlear implant and is hearized to the fullest extent possible. Bills have been proposed with this belief in mind, such as House Bill 1367 in Indiana and Assembly Bill 2072 in California, for example. If schools for the deaf can be closed down as result of such bills, it’s a nice benefit in eyes of most legislators, administrators and society. Why waste money on schools for the deaf when it can be funneled toward public schools? Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

How Sign Language Helps Children With Special Needs

April 16, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Etel Leit, MS

Children with special needs are very unique and they have their own pace in understanding and responding. Most of the children with special needs are visual learners. They need to see what a word is in order to get the meaning or sense of the word. http://www.signshine.com/article/how-does-sign-language-help-children-with-special-needs? Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Does Sign Language Help or Hurt Children with Special Needs?

March 29, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Etel Leit, MS

Children with special needs are each very different and as such, respond to certain teaching methods better than others. Sign language, however, brings many benefits to families with children with special needs, regardless of whether they are hearing or deaf. Sign language brings advantages to all!

Autism, apraxia, or Down Syndrome—these, as well as speech and language delays can all be ameliorated by using sign language in your home or school.  Whether your child has difficulty with social situations, speech, or even tantrums, signing can be a great medium to encourage communication and more appropriate social behaviors.

Sign language does NOT hurt children with special needs. Instead, signing has been found to HELP children who have difficulty making requests, expressing themselves, or even verbally speaking. For children with limited motor skills, sign language is still an option! Children with disabilities like cerebral palsy can make approximations of the signs—which still allow both children and parents to communication and understand each other.

If you have a child with special needs, feel free to contact SignShine® for a list of available classes or programs in your area. It is time to introduce signing into your child and your family’s life. SignShine® can show you how to get started!

by etel leit

Etel Leit, MS is well known in the field of signing with hearing children and is considered an expert by many. Etel, the founder and owner of SignShine® , has extensive experience teaching signing to families, educators, therapists, and fellow signing instructors all over the world. She is also the publisher of BabySignShine.com, the largest international website for signing with children. Her articles have been published and her work has been recognized in a variety of relevant publications. Etel has made numerous TV appearances, both nationally and internationally and she has the invaluable experience of building her own business and brand.  On a more personal note, Etel has years of her own parenting experience; she is mom to two hearing children who sign.

http://www.signshine.com/

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Baby Sign Language and Autism

September 14, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Etel Leit, MS

From subtle to very obvious, the signs that indicate a child has autism vary per child. As it is often difficult to diagnose autism before the age of 3, many parents are left wondering whether their child’s behavior is a sign of a developmental disorder. Before a diagnosis can be accurately determined, one step that parents can take is to incorporate Baby Sign Language into their lives, either at home or under the guidance of a professional. Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Is Baby Sign Language Just a Parenting Fad?

March 17, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Etel Leit, MS

Baby sign language isn’t the first popular parenting method to come around. Remember when babies couldn’t be put to sleep without a Mozart tape playing or else they’d be behind every other kid in preschool? Have you seen all those late-night infomercials for teaching babies to read by simply setting them in front of a television to watch a program? There have been hundreds of trends promising to make your baby an Einstein! So, this begs the question; what makes Baby Sign Language different?  Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Through your Child’s Eyes: American Sign Language

February 13, 2011 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

Communication is one of the most important aspects of every relationship and even more important when parents are trying to bond with their young children.   Communication comes in many forms and is not limited to only the spoken language.  The following 13 minute video describes with vivid imagery and parent interviews how American Sign Language has helped parents connect to their children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The video was produced by DJ Kurs in cooperation with California State University - Northridge and the California Department of Education.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Face-to-Face Time

December 14, 2010 in Special Education Articles by Etel Leit, MS

As parents, we go to great lengths to provide our kids with the best life experience.  We have stacks of parenting books next to our beds, we take endless pictures to remember all the “firsts,” we find interesting activities and friends, we expose them to culture, books, new places, etc.  This is all in addition to the endless basic care we give them.  But at the end of the day, we should all keep in mind that parenting is really about building a relationship with our children.  Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Sign Language is for Children with Special Needs! How can sign language help?

November 9, 2010 in Special Education Articles by Etel Leit, MS

Children of all abilities can reap the rewards of learning sign language, especially children with special needs.  In fact, as parents and professionals who interact with children with special needs know, often the frustration that children can experience is rooted in their difficulty with communicating effectively.   Signing is a great way to help your child build a working vocabulary to assist with communication and ease frustration. Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)