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by Jess

The Importance of Play

June 21, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Research suggests that children’s social imaginative play helps build executive function skills, including self-regulation. A child pretending to be a king may sit longer and more regally on his “throne” than a child who is simply asked to sit still.

Imagination can boost our self-control. Teachers of young children take advantage of this when they quiet a class walking down the hall with, “Let’s pretend to be little mice.” Pretend play strengthens memory and impulse control as children plan a play scenario and act it out, choosing appropriate additions to the storyline and rejecting interruptions and distractions. Read the rest of this entry →

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Therapy comes in all forms: Body Slams and Pile Drivers

March 10, 2011 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

Since my son was a toddler he has been extremely cautious coupled with fine motor and gross motor difficulties.  What this has caused, is a child who does not want to go outside his boundaries and try anything conceived by him to be difficult or scary.  Scary is relative since, at the age of 3 he refused to jump down even from the height of only one step.  What we ended up doing was putting him in gymnastics and later karate.  While both of these helped him make huge strides early on, his lack of interest in these sports, along with his interest in swimming, forced us to stop taking him.  What I started doing at home to compensate for no longer going to gymnastics or karate was “play” wrestling. Read the rest of this entry →

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by Jess

Floor Time: A Developmental Approach to Play Therapy for Children Impacted by Autism

March 1, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Often children who have been derailed by developmental delays like autism present for treatment with very poor or no apparent play skills. There is an equally low level of interest in engaging with play partners. This has led to a rather pessimistic view by psychiatric clinicians of the play capacities of children with developmental challenges. Read the rest of this entry →

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