Learn Your Special Education Laws, Special Education Rights, and Share IEP Goal Ideas

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40 Must See YouTube Videos To Learn About Effective Special Education Teaching Methods

November 27, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Those studying for a degree in special education know that there are many challenges to both studying and practicing these specialized teaching methods. With the education of so many needy children at stake, it is very important to know as much as you can about the subject. Everyone from parents of special needs children to teachers to those who want to see the most disadvantaged children taken care of can benefit from learning more.

To help accomplish this, we have gathered 40 must see YouTube videos to learn about effective special education teaching methods. In addition to teaching a few techniques that can help all sorts of students learn, they can help you learn everything from the basics of special education all the way up to policy practices in the area. Read the rest of this entry →

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The Other Side of the Spectrum

October 9, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

“I’m sure you want to know if he’s on the autism spectrum,” the doctor said. I was dumbstruck. I nodded. An autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was nowhere on my radar but I didn’t let on my surprise.

Instead, I sat through the rest of my son’s doctor’s appointment in a complete fog. How could I be so blindsided? I prided myself for being well informed, investigating all the possible reasons why our sweet, little boy never uttered a mama or dada by the age of 2; why he always fell short of meeting his milestones – turning over, crawling, walking, talking. I always tried to reassure myself that he was on his own developmental track and he would just grow out of it. He’d been given numerous diagnoses none of which explained our child and varied depending on the specialist — verbal apraxia, sensory integration dysfunction, ADHD, even oppositional defiant disorder (ODD).  Read the rest of this entry →

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After The Diagnosis: Sadness or Terror?

May 24, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Doug Goldberg

I would have to say that the worst time in my marriage was before collegeman (DS1) was diagnosed. No one had any idea what was wrong and no one offered any solutions that made any sense. Hubby and I were at odds about what was wrong and how to handle it. I do know that if there had not been a diagnosis and if things had continued in that downward spiral my marriage would have faltered. You cannot continue to raise children and not agree on how to do that. You cannot continue to live in a marriage when there is no acknowledgement of a problem. You cannot continue to be with someone who doesn’t agree with anything you do or say. So luckily for us, collegeman was diagnosed and we figured out what needed to be done to help him. So contrary to all those statistics that tell you that an autism diagnosis will doom your marriage…it actually saved mine. Read the rest of this entry →
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Crying in Therapy

May 17, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

For many parents, family members and therapists, crying can be a big obstacle to overcome when teaching and working with a young child. While it may be difficult to manage this sort of behaviour, it is important to understand why a child is upset as well as the things you can do in order to see his way of thinking. In my opinion, the key to handling this issue is to try to figure out where the child is coming from and be willing to view things from his perspective. In doing so, you will be able to tell the difference between when he is simply protesting something new or if he is hurt and needs you to stop and assist him in his function. Read the rest of this entry →

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Improving Deficits in Communication, Collaboration and Creativity in the Education of the Severely Autistic Child

April 10, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

The most deficient aspects of the special education system today are 1) a lack of consistent communication and collaboration between, teacher, classroom staff, parents, and clinicians and 2) the tendency to think “generically” instead of creatively about educational and behavioral intervention for the severely autistic child.  These issues are most detrimental to the more severely autistic child due to the complexity and uniqueness of some of their behaviors.  These children are in most need of professionals sharing information, committing to a creative and flexible plan of action, and a “sooner than later approach” to the re-evaluation of that plan if it is not working. Read the rest of this entry →

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Learning “Sculpts” Brain Connection

March 31, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Spontaneous brain activity measurably changes after a person learns a new task.

Spontaneous brain activity formerly thought to be “white noise” measurably changes after a person learns a new task, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Chieti, Italy, have shown [Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106:17558-17563].

Scientists also report that the degree of change reflects how well subjects have learned to perform the task.  Read the rest of this entry →

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They Ain’t Happy Tears, But They Should Be

March 28, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

I had an opportunity to work with Tessa this afternoon. Earlier in the day, she brought a book to me that she hoped I’d share with the class. I said I would, but upon flipping through it, I thought better of it, and decided it’d be more meaningful if she read it instead. Read the rest of this entry →

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Therapy comes in all forms: Body Slams and Pile Drivers

March 10, 2011 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

Since my son was a toddler he has been extremely cautious coupled with fine motor and gross motor difficulties.  What this has caused, is a child who does not want to go outside his boundaries and try anything conceived by him to be difficult or scary.  Scary is relative since, at the age of 3 he refused to jump down even from the height of only one step.  What we ended up doing was putting him in gymnastics and later karate.  While both of these helped him make huge strides early on, his lack of interest in these sports, along with his interest in swimming, forced us to stop taking him.  What I started doing at home to compensate for no longer going to gymnastics or karate was “play” wrestling. Read the rest of this entry →

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Learning disabilities as a mountain

February 21, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

I view nonverbal learning disability (NLD) (or any disability) as a mountain between where we are and where we want to be. Some mountains are small, some are huge; some feature gentle slopes, others have vertical cliffs. In any case, there are four things you can do when confronted with a mountain in your path. Read the rest of this entry →

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The IEP Label: Just Get Your Child Some Help

February 14, 2011 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Dennise Goldberg

We are a society of labels and the school system is no different. Parents love to hear when their child is labeled “Gifted” and cringe if their child is labeled “Special Needs.”  I’m writing this to help parents overcome their disdain for the “Special Needs” label.  If you have been told by your school that your child should be tested for Special Education services, then your child is most likely Not Able to access the curriculum in school successfully.  If that is the case, then you as the parent have a responsibility to find what is going on with your child; even if that means he/she could be given the label of “Special Needs.” Read the rest of this entry →

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