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Twas the Night Before an IEP

December 6, 2013 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

Twas the night before an IEP meeting, when all through the house, every creature was stirring and running about. The assessments were filed in a notebook with care, in the hope that we’d get a one on one aide.

My son was having another tantrum in his bed, while visions of ABA therapy danced in my head; And I knew that I was out of my element since I’d never been taught any behavior strategies. When up in the attic arose such a clatter, I sprang from the room to see what was the matter.

Away to the attic I flew like a flash, tore up the ladder and then fell with a crash. I picked myself up, just as the light from above gave luster to my wife holding her stash. And what to my wandering eyes did she have but the behavior analysis thought lost long ago. Read the rest of this entry →

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The Search for the Elusive Chicken Tender

July 27, 2012 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Dennise Goldberg

I’m sure we are not the only parents who struggle to find the foods your child eats while on vacation.  As many of you, we will do what it takes to find something for our son to eat at a restaurant or hotel.  We usually stay at hotel with a timeshare so that we have a kitchen for breakfast and lunch.  Read the rest of this entry →

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by Jess

Focus, dude

July 10, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Jess

I have a secret. Don't tell anyone, but I want to pluck my own eyeballs out when I'm reading stuff about special education. It makes my head hurt. I have to keep Google hot and ready every time I start reading about new goals, education models, or laws. Even with those "plain language" oh-so-helpful packets we get, my eyes cross. I'm an active and informed parent. I do my best to stay on top of my son's education and help other parents, but I have to admit that a bonfire with these reams of reading material has crossed my mind more than once.  Read the rest of this entry →

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by Jess

If Schools Could Have IEP’s

March 27, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Jess

It has come to be my belief that IEPs are used far too infrequently. We have limited ourselves by only applying IEP’s to children. There are so many other places in life where they might be appropriate. I would like to suggest that some schools might benefit from having an IEP that sets in place goals that assist them in helping special needs children. I’m not suggesting that all schools need such a document, solely the ones who present some significant disorder or impairment that inhibits their ability to correctly and adequately teach the special education children that are a part of their community.

While the more angry and embittered in advocacy circles might argue that such schools could be qualified under the emotional disturbance category; I believe the correct qualifying condition would be to place such schools under the visually impaired category. The federal definition of “Visual impairment including blindness means an impairment in vision that, even with correction, adversely affects a child’s educational performance. The term includes both partial sight and blindness.” 34 CFR 300.7 (c)(13). If a student is found to have an impairment, the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team must also determine whether the student has a need for special education.  Read the rest of this entry →

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Are You My IEP

February 22, 2012 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

In honor of the upcoming Dr. Seuss week I have updated my son’s favorite book written by Dr. Seuss’s protégé, P.D. Eastman. “Are You My Mother.”

A mother dropped her child off at a new school. She told the Principal, “My child has an IEP but he wants to learn.” So the mother left her child with the school and away she went. The child was told to walk over to his new class but to pick up his IEP on the way out. So the child began to look for his IEP. He looked up and did not see his IEP. He looked down and did not see his IEP. “I will go and look for my IEP,” he said. So away he went. Read the rest of this entry →

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The Language of IEP’s

October 6, 2011 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

I am not a Special Education Teacher, School Psychologist, School Administrator or a Related Service Provider.  I am a parent of a child with special needs.  This means it’s not important what I’m not, what’s important is what I am, and what this means.  This means I am my child’s best advocate and I am responsible for steering the ship towards adulthood and independence.  This also means I must assimilate into a world that was originally unknown to me.  So while I already stated what I am not, I have learned how to speak the language.  I call it the language of Individualized Education Programs (IEP).  Like any foreign language I didn’t learn how to be conversational overnight but with time and practice I have learned the nuances of the language. Read the rest of this entry →

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The unbelievable true story of dealing with a specialty pharmacy!!

September 22, 2010 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

I’ve been lucky so far in that none of my son’s disabilities required him to take medication.  Many, many hours of therapy but no medication.  That changed a few months ago when he started on growth hormones. Read the rest of this entry →

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