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Sorting Through Online Educational Training Systems

June 3, 2013 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Finding Virtual Learning Technology Answers. Parents and teachers are finding a proliferation of virtual remediation to acceleration brain training programs promising fast and optimum gains in learning reading, math, and science that are research based. It is difficult to believe these promises, as most often the program designers do not have a background in classroom implementation let alone e-Learning implementation, which is totally different form pure classroom teaching.

Many virtual learning entrepreneurs come from backgrounds of scientists and somewhat related fields to education like optometry (testing vision), psychiatry, psychology, and medicine pediatrics (medically treating the whole child, and prescribing stimulant medications). Others are business and technology product development entrepreneurs who have never worked in a classroom, and understand technology delivery parameters, but not how children/adults actually learn and retain information so that it will transfer into real life productivity. Read the rest of this entry →

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What is a Cognitive Skills Profile

November 9, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

The answer to your child’s educational concerns no longer has to be a mystery.

Weak cognitive skills could be the source of your child’s struggles. Science has found that the real cause of a person’s ability to learn lies in the strength, or weakness, of that person’s cognitive skills. If skills are strong, learning comes easily and “naturally.” But skill weaknesses can remain hidden and cause a student to struggle with learning or reading. A professional cognitive skills test is the only way to pinpoint the exact underlying cause of any learning problem. Cognitive skills determine a student’s abilities in the 5 core elements that make up intelligence. Read the rest of this entry →

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Homework: The Sensory System and Mental Health

July 20, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

It is the fall, school has been in session for over 2 months now, and in many households across America the battle lines have been drawn. On one side: the parents plaintively asking “have you done your homework?” and on the other,  the child—suddenly non-verbal or explosively combative. Read the rest of this entry →

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Educational Therapy from my local University

July 13, 2011 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Dennise Goldberg

Living in Southern California, there are many colleges and universities.  We are lucky to be living near California State University, Northridge which has a Learning Center on Campus to help students with Special Needs.  In conjunction with the Michael D. Eisner College of Education, the clinic at the Learning Center provides high quality affordable services for children with learning differences, such as literacy challenges.  This summer, the center is working with the Association of Educational Therapists (AET) to provide Educational Therapy for students to work on their skills.  Read the rest of this entry →

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Struggling Readers Need Small Classes

July 12, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Being in a small class, with a quality teacher, positively and profoundly effects children:

Most of the research done in the last 30 years [shows] … that small classes, especially in the primary grades, boost student achievement and that the benefits last through later grades when students are in ordinary size classrooms…. If we really want all the excellent teachers policymakers, politicians, and pundits are calling for, we have to be willing to provide the school supports that are necessary. One of those supports is reasonable class sizes that allow teachers to do their job to the best of their ability (Joanne Yatvin, past president of the National Council of Teachers of English). Read the rest of this entry →

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10 Easy Tips to Help Your Elementary-Age Child Study for a Test

July 10, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Helping your child to study effectively for tests is vitally important in the elementary years. When the groundwork for good habits is set early on, students are more likely to experience success and increased motivation. You can make a difference in your child’s academic performance now and in the future by trying some of the following tips.

Studying for Math

1.  Use a dry erase board

To practice for an upcoming test, write a few math problems on a small dry erase board. Kids love using dry erase boards and many prefer them over traditional pencil and paper. Try out different color markers, too. Color increases attention, so don’t be afraid of using bold hues. Read the rest of this entry →

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Can Students with Learning Disabilities Learn How to Learn?

May 31, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Many middle school and high school students with reading disabilities have difficulty understanding their textbooks and succeeding on assignments. Reasons for their difficulties include:

  • Their inability to understand the demands of the task
  • Instruction devoted solely to the mastery of subject materials, such as a social studies chapter. Read the rest of this entry →
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An Interview with Carol Murphy: The impact of speech-language disorders on learning

May 22, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

1)           Carol, the field of “learning disabilities” has been with us for many years. What do you feel are the current issues in identification?

The field of learning disabilities has made great progress over the years, including better assessments and the use of MRI brain imaging, allowing for earlier and more definitive identification of a child’s learning disabilities.  Further, research into specific programs or therapeutic strategies for intervention, have greatly enhanced the ability to more closely match the learning profile of students, thus reducing the unnecessary and time consuming attempts to find the appropriate remediation tools. 

However, as I see it, there is often a disconnect between educational and clinical assessments, diagnostic identification and qualifying for assistance. Since I live in California, I can be specific to my state, although most other states follow similar patterns. Read the rest of this entry →

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IEP Team Communication All Year Long

May 18, 2011 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Dennise Goldberg

In the past, I have talked about the importance of parent participation in developing your child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP); however, parent participation should not end on the day of the IEP meeting.  When both the school personnel and the parents understand that the path to a successful IEP starts with ongoing communication and support from the home environment, everybody wins!  I have seen resistance to this type of ongoing communication from both parents and school personnel for a variety of reasons.  What’s important to keep in mind, is finding the appropriate method to educate a child with a disability.  If it takes a village to raise a child, imagine what it takes to raise a child with a disability. Read the rest of this entry →

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Why Parents Need to Know About Neuroplasticity

May 9, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Four words revolutionize how we now view and help kids with special needs: The brain can change.  That’s a powerful statement with huge implications. 

Only a few decades ago, scientists were convinced the brain was hard-wired . . .  that was until modern technology, such as MRIs and PET scans, proved otherwise.  With the same certainty that we know the sun rises, we now also know that the brain has the ability to change and re-organize itself. This phenomenon is called neuroplasticity. Read the rest of this entry →

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