Learn Your Special Education Laws, Special Education Rights, and Share IEP Goal Ideas

You are browsing the archive for Counseling.

Ten Related Services for an IEP you may not know about

August 19, 2013 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Dennise Goldberg

In General the term Related Service means services designed to enable a child with a disability to receive a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) as described in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) as may be required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education.  The Related Services most people are familiar with are Speech and Language Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy and Transportation.

The following list describes ten Related Services you may not know about:  Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 3.8/5 (18 votes cast)
Profile photo of Jess

by Jess

Working Together to Educate a Child with an Emotional Disability

May 9, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Jess

There appears to be a lot of misunderstanding about services and programs for children with emotional disabilities. Emotional disturbance is one of the disability categories that children can qualify for special education services under, according to the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The following is the definition as it is written into the IDEA Regulations.

“Emotional disturbance means a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics over a long period of time and to a marked degree that adversely affects a child's educational performance: an inability to learn that cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors, an inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers, inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances, a general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression and/or a tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems.” Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Addressing Bullying in an IEP

May 7, 2012 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

As a Parent the first reaction you have when someone is bullying your child is to emulate your best Al Capone impression from the Untouchabales.

I want you to get this guy where he breathes! I want you to find this Eliot Ness, I want him dead! I want his family dead! I want his house burned to the ground! (I have edited this quote for language and shortened it but you get the idea)

While this might be your first reaction, this also happens to be the worst possible course of action. When your child is being bullied the number one issue should be your child, not the other child’s punishment. This is an extremely hard pill to swallow but is necessary for your child’s safety and well-being. Children with disabilities are very often the target of bullying but these same children will most likely have an Individualized Education Program (IEP) which can be used as an effective way to address the bullying. Before addressing the issue in an IEP the following steps should be taken in writing: Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)
Profile photo of Jess

by Jess

Fight or Flight: Anxiety in the Classroom

April 23, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Fight or Flight. Those are the two typical responses we have to a threatening situation. It is a basic response we humans share with other species and can be quite adaptive in a real life dangerous event. As the human brain has developed, we have gained thinking skills. This has been quite an advantage in many ways, but has become a liability as well. It has brought on anxiety, the fear of the unknown and the anticipation of negative outcomes.

Even anxiety can be helpful. It is what keeps us driving slow in a snowstorm and motivates kids to study for the spelling test on Friday. In moderate doses, anxiety keeps us on the straight and narrow and helps us make choices that are helpful to us. I joke with some of my clients that someone with a complete lack of anxiety is also called a criminal!  Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 3.0/5 (2 votes cast)

After 27 Years, School Districts in California are once again responsible for Mental Health Services

July 15, 2011 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Dennise Goldberg

Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), children with disabilities are entitled to a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) with the assistance of related services.  One of these related services are mental health services.  A child, who qualifies for special education, has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) and who requires mental health services may receive services at no cost. 

Prior to 1984, California schools were responsible for providing these mental health services for students with an IEP who needed them.  In 1984, the California Assembly Speaker Willie Brown authored AB 3632 requiring counties, not School Districts, to provide these mental health services to the students that qualified.  This was because there were major concerns that students with mental health needs were not receiving proper mental health services as required by IDEA.  After 27 years of California School Districts working jointly with County Mental Health to provide these mental health services, last week all of that changed!! Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

LAUSD to Place School Psychologists on Reduced Work Schedule

March 29, 2011 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

In yet another major blow to the Los Angeles Unified School District’s 82,000 Special Education students, next year they will have limited access to their School Psychologists.  Last week, LAUSD distributed an email to all of its School Psychologists informing them that for the 2011 – 2012 school year they will be put on a reduced work schedule.  This comes on the heels of the 2010 - 2011 cuts to LAUSD’s Special Education program which included closing approximately 200 Special Day Classes.  Exactly how this reduced work schedule will play out is unclear, but schools will be without a school psychologist for multiple weeks. Read the rest of this entry →

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (5 votes cast)