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by Jess

Communicating with Your Child

July 1, 2014 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Maybe They Need To See What You Say!   

We believe hearing sounds begins in the womb; perhaps learning to recognize a mother’s voice or benefitting from listening to certain types of music. So in all likelihood processing sounds, the beginning of language acquisition begins before birth. A parent may or may not enhance those opportunities. After birth those who have a significant role in a child’s life have a major part to play in language development.  Read the rest of this entry →

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The Inspirational Teacher Series – Nicole Eredics

April 30, 2012 in Inspirational Teacher Series by Dennise Goldberg

We have started a weekly feature on Special Education Advisor called the "Inspirational Teacher Series". Our goal is to help SEA readers understand the hard work and dedication educators put forth every day. We also want to highlight the positive experiences of educating our students with a disability.

Today is our very first installment of the Inspirational Teacher Series and I couldn’t think of a better person to start with than inclusion specialist, Nicole Eredics. Read the rest of this entry →

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Does Sign Language Help or Hurt Children with Special Needs?

March 29, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Etel Leit, MS

Children with special needs are each very different and as such, respond to certain teaching methods better than others. Sign language, however, brings many benefits to families with children with special needs, regardless of whether they are hearing or deaf. Sign language brings advantages to all!

Autism, apraxia, or Down Syndrome—these, as well as speech and language delays can all be ameliorated by using sign language in your home or school.  Whether your child has difficulty with social situations, speech, or even tantrums, signing can be a great medium to encourage communication and more appropriate social behaviors.

Sign language does NOT hurt children with special needs. Instead, signing has been found to HELP children who have difficulty making requests, expressing themselves, or even verbally speaking. For children with limited motor skills, sign language is still an option! Children with disabilities like cerebral palsy can make approximations of the signs—which still allow both children and parents to communication and understand each other.

If you have a child with special needs, feel free to contact SignShine® for a list of available classes or programs in your area. It is time to introduce signing into your child and your family’s life. SignShine® can show you how to get started!

by etel leit

Etel Leit, MS is well known in the field of signing with hearing children and is considered an expert by many. Etel, the founder and owner of SignShine® , has extensive experience teaching signing to families, educators, therapists, and fellow signing instructors all over the world. She is also the publisher of BabySignShine.com, the largest international website for signing with children. Her articles have been published and her work has been recognized in a variety of relevant publications. Etel has made numerous TV appearances, both nationally and internationally and she has the invaluable experience of building her own business and brand.  On a more personal note, Etel has years of her own parenting experience; she is mom to two hearing children who sign.

http://www.signshine.com/

 

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by Jess

Developing Communication Skills in the Atypical Child

January 16, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Jess

It is most important to first understand the complexity of speech. Speech is a means of communicating through spoken language, and therefore using proper speech by way of language (sounds) we can establish intelligent receptive and expressive communication with others.  

Errors in receptive and expressive language abilities occur when the production of sounds (articulation), and a misappropriation of the system of rules for organizing those sounds are made, hence Phonological disorders will occur. Read the rest of this entry →

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Baby Sign Language and Autism

September 14, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Etel Leit, MS

From subtle to very obvious, the signs that indicate a child has autism vary per child. As it is often difficult to diagnose autism before the age of 3, many parents are left wondering whether their child’s behavior is a sign of a developmental disorder. Before a diagnosis can be accurately determined, one step that parents can take is to incorporate Baby Sign Language into their lives, either at home or under the guidance of a professional. Read the rest of this entry →

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by Jess

Six Techniques to Facilitate Early Childhood Speech

July 20, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

The following six techniques and exercises will help facilitate early childhood speech, language, and communicative development; in particular, they will assist the child with a speech & language delay. About.com will feature a video clip of myself explaining and demonstrating each technique.

According to a seminal research by Dr. Todd Risley, American babies from families of all socio-economic levels heard on average 1,440 words per hour, and by age three had practiced saying between 4 million to 12 million words. The difference in how much a parent and child talked to each other was strongly correlated with the differences in the toddler’s vocabulary and intellectual achievement at both at age three and age nine. In other words, children tended to develop better vocabularies and have better intellectual achievement if their parents were more social with them.  Read the rest of this entry →

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