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by Jess

Cerebral Palsy Fact Sheet

October 6, 2013 in The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities by Jess

Jennifer’s Story

Jen was born 11 weeks early and weighed only 2½ pounds. The doctors were surprised to see what a strong, wiggly girl she was. But when Jen was just a few days old, she stopped breathing and was put on a ventilator. After 24 hours she was able to breathe on her own again. The doctors did a lot of tests to find out what had happened, but they couldn’t find anything wrong. The rest of Jen’s time in the hospital was quiet, and after two months she was able to go home. Everyone thought she would be just fine.

At home, Jen’s mom noticed that Jen was really sloppy when she drank from her bottle. As the months went by, Jen’s mom noticed other things she didn’t remember seeing with Jen’s older brother. At six months, Jen didn’t hold her head up straight. She cried a lot and would go stiff with rage. When Jen went back for her six-month checkup, the doctor was concerned by what he saw and what Jen’s mom told him. He suggested that Jen’s mom take the little girl to a doctor who could look closely at Jen’s development. Jen’s mom took her to a developmental specialist who finally put a name to all the little things that hadn’t seemed right with Jen–cerebral palsy. Read the rest of this entry →

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I See You

June 24, 2012 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Dennise Goldberg

I see you.
I see you.
 
Others see you flapping your arms, screaming and melting down.
Not me.
I see the person you really are.
Autism is a part of you BUT you are more than that.
You are a whole person with hopes and dreams and the ability to contribute to the world in amazing ways. Read the rest of this entry →
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by Jess

Crying in Therapy

May 17, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

For many parents, family members and therapists, crying can be a big obstacle to overcome when teaching and working with a young child. While it may be difficult to manage this sort of behaviour, it is important to understand why a child is upset as well as the things you can do in order to see his way of thinking. In my opinion, the key to handling this issue is to try to figure out where the child is coming from and be willing to view things from his perspective. In doing so, you will be able to tell the difference between when he is simply protesting something new or if he is hurt and needs you to stop and assist him in his function. Read the rest of this entry →

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