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by Jess

Visual Impairment, Including Blindness Fact Sheet

October 6, 2013 in The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities by Jess

Julian’s Story

When Julian was almost two years old, he developed this adorable habit of closing one eye when he looked at you. It almost seemed as if he were winking. The possibility that Julian had a visual impairment didn’t initially occur to his parents, but when Julian’s right eye started crossing inward toward his nose…

Off they went to the eye doctor, who confirmed that, yes, Julian had a visual impairment—amblyopia, often called “lazy eye.” As the most common cause of vision problems in children, amblyopia is the medical term used when vision in one eye is reduced because that eye and the brain are not working together properly. (1)  Julian was also very farsighted, especially in the eye he’d taken to closing.

Soon Julian had a brand-new pair of durable glasses suited to his active two-year-old self. The eye doctor also put an eyepatch over Julian’s better eye, so that he would have to use the weaker eye and strengthen its communication with the brain. Otherwise, the eye doctor said, the brain would begin to ignore the images sent by the weaker eye, resulting in permanent vision problems in that eye.

Julian took good care of his glasses, but he didn’t take well to the patch, unfortunately. He ripped it off every time his parents put it on…and back on… and back on again. So today his eye still turns inward if he doesn’t wear his glasses. Read the rest of this entry →

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Profile photo of Jess

by Jess

Deaf-Blindness Fact Sheet

October 6, 2013 in The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities by Jess

About Deaf-Blindness

There are approximately roughly 45,000 to 50,000 individuals in the U.S who are deaf-blind. [1] According to the 2007 National Deaf-Blind Child Count, over 10,000 are children under the age of 21.[2]

The word “deaf-blindness” may seem as if a person cannot hear or see at all. The term actually describes a person who has some degree of loss in both vision and hearing. The amount of loss in either vision or hearing will vary from person to person.

Our nation’s special education law, the IDEA, defines “deaf-blindness” as:

…concomitant [simultaneous] hearing and visual impairments, the combination of which causes such severe communication and other developmental and educational needs that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for children with deafness or children with blindness. [§300.8(c)(2)]

The National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness observes that the “key feature of deaf-blindness is that the combination of losses limits access to auditory and visual information.” [3] This can severely limit an individual’s natural opportunities to learn and communicate with others. Read the rest of this entry →

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The Inspirational Teacher Series – Amanda Thompson

July 4, 2012 in Inspirational Teacher Series by Dennise Goldberg

Today in the Inspirational Teacher Series we profile Amanda Thompson.  Amanda has been teaching for 3 years and specializes in working with children who are blind or vision impaired.  I hope you enjoy her profile.

1. What is your name?

Amanda Thompson 

2. What is your education level and credentials?

I have my Master's of Education in Special Education, focusing on visual impairments and students who access the general education curriculum.  Read the rest of this entry →

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Consideration of Special Factors in an IEP

June 7, 2011 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires the IEP Team to consider five special factors in developing, reviewing, and revising a child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP).  The five special factors are listed in IDEA and read as follow:  Read the rest of this entry →

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