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Students with ADHD can be eligible for an IEP

August 13, 2012 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Dennise Goldberg

I can’t believe in the year 2012 we are still discussing whether a child with ADHD can qualify for an IEP.  Many people continue to point out that there are 13 disability categories listed in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) isn’t one of them.  The 13 categories are Read the rest of this entry →

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Spotting Inattentive ADHD

May 13, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Spotting people with Inattentive ADHD (ADHD-I) can be as difficult as finding Waldo in those busy picture books. People with ADHD-I do not stand out, blend into the setting they are in, and are perfectly happy if they are never found. Trevor is a good example.

Trevor is a quiet, well behaved, seventh grader who always sits in the back of the classroom. He rarely listens to a word that his biology teacher says, instead, he spends his time thinking about the science fiction book that he is reading. There will be a biology test in five days and he will barely pass it. Read the rest of this entry →

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Managing Special Needs in a Big Family

May 1, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Hi, my name is Mac and I am a stay at home mama of 5 boys, we live in St Louis, Mo. My husband, "Big Daddy", has 2 boys- Thing 1, a 17 year old bipolar rebel, and Thing 2- 16 with ADHD. I have 3 of my own. An 11 year old, Walter, who is also ADHD. Alexander the Great, 9, has severe autism and ADHD (since, you know, autism never travels alone). Goofy is the baby at 5 (and our last dose of ADHD). Read the rest of this entry →

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Puberty, Sex Ed and the Child with Special Needs

March 21, 2012 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

I am 40 years old, married and have one 11 year old child and yet I am still waiting for my Dad to have “the talk” with me. Based on the conversations I have had with my friends, I am not alone. Many Parents are so uncomfortable having “the talk” with their children that they simple ignore it. I don’t recommend this strategy for any parent; however, for parents raising a child with special needs it’s even more important to discuss the subject of puberty and sex in an open and frank manner. Read the rest of this entry →

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When an Attention Deficit Isn’t

March 6, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Addison is in the 6th grade, her first year in middle school. She did pretty well in elementary school, but she’s getting slammed in 6th grade. A couple of her teachers have described her appearing distracted, making mistakes with details, and being disorganized with her work. Addison admits to “zoning out” a lot during classes like English, Spanish, science, and geography. So clearly she has ADHD and could use some medication to help her focus.

Except that maybe she doesn’t have ADHD at all. Read the rest of this entry →

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Driven to Distraction by Anesthesia

February 29, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Jess

The Mayo Clinic recently reported that researchers have found that children exposed to anesthesia multiple times before the age of 3 have double the incidence of ADHD than those with no exposure to anesthesia. You can read the report here. In a 2009 report Mayo linked multiple anesthesia exposures before age 4 to learning disabilities.

Great. My son, has arthrogryposis and had three major surgeries and at least four smaller surgeries before age 3. Nothing we can do about that now. He has had many more surgeries since then. We have long noticed that he is inattentive. We also see that his memory suffers after surgeries. Nevertheless, without those surgeries his ability to walk, run, write, and feed himself would all be more severely impacted.For my child, and many like him, surgery is a necessity. Read the rest of this entry →

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2012 Update: Essential Special Education Twitter Feeds to Follow

January 27, 2012 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Dennise Goldberg

Below is a list of Special Education Twitter Feeds worth following.  The list includes Parents, Educators, Advocates, Attorneys, Therapists and National Organizations.  This list should keep you up to date on everything happening in and around the world of Special Education. Read the rest of this entry →

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Creative Music Therapy: Music’s Capacity to Reach Developmental Potential

January 8, 2012 in Special Education Articles by Jess

We all want to be heard and understood, we want to be able to express the depths of our feelings and live life to the fullest of our abilities. In music therapy this is possible. Music does not discriminate instead it has the capacity to uncover our potentials. The vast qualities of music itself can reach the broadest of emotions and stimulate the mind and body. Music Therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program. Its clinical use spans a wide range of populations. Music therapists assess emotional well-being, physical health, social functioning, communication abilities, & cognitive skills through specifically designed music interventions for individuals and groups based upon the client needs. Read the rest of this entry →

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My child was referred for psychological testing – what does that mean?

October 2, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

I have noticed that many of the parents who call me because their child was referred for psychological testing are surprised and uncertain about the reason for the referral. In addition, it is unclear to them how an evaluation can be helpful. This is the first in a series of blog posts aiming to demystify the process of psychological assessment and discuss the benefits of having a child evaluated. Read the rest of this entry →

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5 simple stages that can help your child manage his ADHD at school

September 19, 2011 in Special Education Articles by Jess

I was diagnosed with ADHD when I was 6. At the time, my parents received too many complaints about my behavior. "She is incredibly smart and her grades are top of her class," my teachers would say. They would follow with problems with my conduct. I couldn't sit still or stop talking. I tried helping others because I was restless all the time. Even doing sports every afternoon did nothing to lower my hyperactivity.

My mother was soon referred to a behavioral therapist because she said I was never to be medicated. Another issue was money. We didn't have much so we couldn't afford weekly sessions or frequent follow ups. The behavioral therapist decided she would instruct my mother how she would help me through a simple exercise. It's completely free and it can be done at home. Read the rest of this entry →

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