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Reading Disabilities: The Make-Or-Break Grade

November 30, 2010 in Special Education Articles by Jess

For your child to succeed in middle and high school, he needs to become a proficient reader by the end of third grade. If not, his reading problems will likely persist through high school, causing other academic problems and increasing the likelihood of social and emotional problems; in adulthood, struggles with reading will diminish his chance of getting and holding a decent job. As the Annie E. Casey Foundation so clearly states: Read the rest of this entry →

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Special Education Done Right

November 29, 2010 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

When Special Education is done correctly, it is a powerful tool to educate children with a disability.   I spend a lot of time writing about special education laws, parental rights, writing IEP’s and non-compliance by School Districts but decided I would spend today writing about some of the most positive, recent examples I’ve seen in Special Education.   There are actually many different types of positive examples I can think of, but I decided to focus on three.  

The first is a program offered for pre-school aged children, in one of the many School Districts I cover in my advocate work, called the Kid Intensive Therapy Center.  This program is 2.5 hours a day 5 days a week and provides intensive/evidence-based early intervention.  The program utilizes applied behavior analysis (ABA) strategies and integrates speech and language into the classroom. Read the rest of this entry →

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In Praise of Praise: The Right Words Can Motivate Your Child

November 28, 2010 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Praise is a powerful tool, especially when it comes to homework. Research shows that by simply praising effort rather than intelligence, kids will develop greater motivation to keep trying, even when the going gets tough.

Dr. Carol Dweck conducted a landmark study on the effects of praise on 400 fifth graders. One at a time, the children were given a fairly easy, non-verbal IQ test. After randomly dividing the children, some were praised for their intelligence (“You must be smart at this”) and the others were praised for their effort (“You must have worked really hard”). Remarkably, in a second round of testing, the children that had been praised for effort improved on their first score by about 30 percent. They did this by working diligently on each problem even as they became increasingly more difficult. Read the rest of this entry →

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Four Simple Ways To Help The Easily Frustrated Child

November 23, 2010 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Some kids are naturally easy-going, compliant, and adaptable. With very little input from you, they come home from school, sit right down, and do their homework. If they encounter a problem they can’t solve, or read a passage they don’t understand, they’re able to ask for help. Other kids are not as even-keeled. Their moods are quick to change, their tempers are volatile, and they are easily frustrated. They often complain that their homework is too hard or too boring. If they encounter difficulties before you have a chance to intervene, they have a meltdown. Their low frustration tolerance makes homework a battleground. Read the rest of this entry →

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Even on IDEA’s 35th, Discrimination and Ignorance runs rampant

November 22, 2010 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Dennise Goldberg

I planned on taking the week off from writing my blog since my son with a learning disability is off from school, but that was before I read Education Week’s most recent article, “Even on IDEA’s 35th, Special Ed Dollars Aren’t Free.” Education week claims to be America’s education newspaper and website of record, but clearly doesn’t represent one of the largest portions of the student age population, the Special Education Demographic. Did you know that more than 13% of all students in the United States receive special education? This represents more than 6 million students across the United States. If you haven’t read Education Week’s rebel rousing article, I think this quote sums it up best: Read the rest of this entry →

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How and Why Do We Evaluate Attention?

November 21, 2010 in Special Education Articles by Jess

One of the more confusing aspects of the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Disorder is how the concept of proper attention is evaluated.  In this brief overview, I will attempt to clarify some of the issues that are a central component in evaluating attention.  The main factors affecting attention span are discussed below in more detail: Read the rest of this entry →

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Equine Facilitated Therapy: Three Methods

November 19, 2010 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Equine Facilitated Therapy (EFT) is a name given to three related methods: Hippotherapy, Therapeutic Riding, and Animal-Assisted Therapy. EFT can improve attention, memory, cognition, language, and learning.

HIPPOTHERAPY (HT)

“Hippotherapy” comes from the Greek root word for horse, hippo. It is a therapeutic method that uses the movement of the horse to facilitate learning. Traditionally HT has been used for people, particularly children, with physical handicaps; however, it has long been known to help activate language learning. A centering foundation can be established that can improve clients’ neurological function and sensory processing. Read the rest of this entry →

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Holiday Blues Busters

November 16, 2010 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Holidays can be a hard time for many of us.  Then add the stress of raising a child with special needs during this time of year.  Oh my, just the thought can be overwhelming. There are many things to consider. Read the rest of this entry →

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Bullying is Never Okay: How to use a Gebser Letter

November 15, 2010 in Special Education Advisor Blog by Doug Goldberg

Most schools have a zero tolerance policy when it comes to bullying, but ultimately that is not enough if the administration turns a blind eye to the situation.  It’s not enough to retroactively discipline bullies after the fact, the school administration needs to get involved early and often.  This is especially true if the bullying is due to your child’s disability.  One of the largest groups of children who are bullied in public schools, are children with disabilities.  Read the rest of this entry →

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Reading Comprehension Strategies That Work: Anchoring Visualizations

November 14, 2010 in Special Education Articles by Jess

Some kids have trouble with reading comprehension. There can be many reasons they have difficulty, but one of the main causes of reading comprehension problems is that students do not create vivid images as they read.  Read the rest of this entry →

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